My thoughts on if I had to do it all over again, and what I would choose.

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Photo by Nathan Dumlao on Unsplash

Everyone always has something that they regret or wish they could have done differently. For me, that thing is college. No, I don’t regret attending. In the seven years I spent in college, I learned quite a bit and enjoyed my time (somewhat). However, there are quite a few things that I wish I could have done differently.

Starting from the beginning, I think it would have been beneficial to take a couple of college courses while still in high school. Grades could put a wrench in this plan, but my high school marks were average. This would have potentially…


Time to correct my wrongdoings

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Photo by J. Kelly Brito on Unsplash

A few months ago, I wrote an article about converting one of my Flask APIs to FastAPI. It was an incredible journey and I learned a lot, but a few mistakes had been made along the way. Fortunately for me, the Medium community was kind enough to point out my errors and explain what I did wrong.

At the beginning of the article, the first thing that I did, was laid out the steps needed to install FastAPI.

pip3 install fastapi
pip3 install uvicorn
pip3 install pydantic

This may look like a normal installation of Python packages, except that there…


It’s still experimental…

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Photo by Aron Yigin on Unsplash

Something you can likely conclude from my previous articles is that I prefer using the command line interface whenever possible. Admittedly, there have been times where I have worked harder to use the command line. One such occasion was my introduction to R article, in which we used Visual Studio Code and the terminal to run the R script. It would have been much easier to use something like RStudio, which we did for graphs, but nothing wrong with learning a little command line now and then.

In case you are new to Docker or need a refresher, it is…


Is R the right language for me?

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Photo by Chris Liverani on Unsplash

From time-to-time, I enjoy browsing for available jobs in my area. Not only does it aid in finding new opportunities, but it also provides a perspective on what skills are up-and-coming. Knowing which languages to study early on can be critical to getting a job. This was a reason I created a Kubernetes Cluster on Raspberry Pis for my Individual Studies course in College. It is also why I am working on more Kubernetes work, moving now to virtual machines. If you want to learn more about that project, I have another series on Kubernetes you can check out here.


CODEX

Deploying a Python API to Kubernetes

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Photo by Chris Ried on Unsplash

Recap

Looking back at what we’ve done so far, numerous accomplishments have been made. In Part 2, we built a Kubernetes cluster on top of four virtual machines. We followed that up, by deploying a MySQL database in Part 3. The next major leap to take is to deploy an API (Application Programming Interface) and test it out.

Deploying to the Cluster

Before diving in, there are a few extra things we are going to need:

  • An API (Any API will work. For demonstration purposes, I will be using this logging API)
  • Development machine (Laptop, desktop, whatever you prefer)
  • Docker Hub account

Once you have…


Part 4 in an introduction to using — and making the most of — MongoDB

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Photo by Mire Carlo on Unsplash

Recap

In part three, we started working on the FastAPI portion of the monthly budgeting app project. To start, we downloaded the necessary module and began implementation. Because MongoDB uses NoSQL, we had to get a little creative. Once pymongo was hooked up and working, we were able to connect to the database. For each collection, we created an endpoint to get each document.

Continuation

Next, we can work on other endpoints to insert and delete. Before we do that, we can also cover how to delete on the MongoDB end, as we previously only covered how to insert to the collection.


It’s more important than what you think…

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Photo by Micheile Henderson on Unsplash

Normally, when blogging, I like to stick to the world of technology. However, from time to time, I find it helpful to reflect on the road taken that got me where I am today. When doing so, I let my mind wander back to that warm, sunny day in the summer of 2009. I was looking out the back porch of my parents' house wondering about my next steps in life. Less than twenty-four hours earlier, I had graduated from high school and started a new part-time job. The plan was to also start college the following Fall semester. There…


From Installation to Implementation Part 3

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Photo by Michael Walter on Unsplash

Recap

In part one, I started building a database to use for a monthly budgeting application. We covered the installation of MongoDB, as well as some of the syntax differences. After installing, we created a database, our first collection, and also created a document to go inside of this Grocery collection.

In part two, we discussed more options surrounding collections, such as size limits and validations. Having learned the cap limit, we created a sample collection to test on, as well as test data. We also discussed how to insert multiple documents at a time. After this, the remaining collections were…


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Photo by Sarah Kilian on Unsplash

Over the past couple of months, I have been writing a lot about FastAPI and how awesome it is. Yet, the one thing that has been severely lacking in most of my articles is error handling. I usually would just talk about the main point of the article and mention that it should be added in later. The few times that I would include error handling, it would be done incorrectly. Essentially, I was always returning a status of 200 regardless of the error. …


Learning the Hard Way

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Photo by Matt Botsford on Unsplash

In my free time, I am attempting to build my own smart home devices. One feature they will need is speech recognition. While I am not certain yet as to how exactly I want to implement that feature, I thought it would be interesting to dive in and explore different options. The first I wanted to try was the SpeechRecognition library.

Why the hard way?

To put a long story short, this tutorial is going to be a little bit different. There were several errors I had to deal with and even redirect my focus. That being said, the coding portion is simple. Only…

Mike Wolfe

Software Developer, Tech Enthusiast, Runner. Current project http://sqlcheater.com/

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